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Before the Summer Crowds

A film by Mohamed Khan
Rights:
The film introduces an unusual viewpoint in Egyptian cinema on a number of intertwined relationships who come from different social classes carrying different thoughts, emotional and sensual aspects.
Before the Summer Crowds Poster
2015/ Egypt
90 MIN/ Drama
Original Title
Abl Zahmet El Seif
SYNOPSIS
Set in a seaside resort, the film tracks a group of people who meet each other at the beginning of summer season and all get tangled in the paradoxes of love, jealousy, desire and disappointments.
CAST
Maged El Kedwany
Hana Shiha
Ahmed Dawood
Lana Mushtaq
Hany El Metennawy
CREW
Screenwriter: Ghada Shahbender, Nura El Sheikh
Editor: Dina Farouk
DOP: Victor Credi
Production Company(ies)
Middle West Films
Film Clinic
The Producers
Wika for Film Production and Distribution
MAD Solutions
Producer(s)
Wael Omar
Mohamed Hefzy
Hani Osama
Mohamed Khan
Dina Farouk
Alaa Karkouti
Jamal Al Dabbous
World premiere at the Dubai International Film Festival, UAE
Luxor African Film Festival, Egypt
Karama Human Rights Film Festival, Jordan
Cairo International Film Festival, Egypt
Tripoli Film Festival, Lebanon
Mostra de Cinema EgípcioContemporâneo, Brazil
ANA Contemporary Arab Cinema, USA
Three awards at the Cairo Film Society Festival;
Best Sound (Bassem El Elaimy)
Best Music (Layal Watfeh)
Best Actor in a Leading Role (Maged El Kedwany)
Quotes
“Mohamed Khan has fashioned a deceptively light ensemble piece in Before The Summer Crowds, which he serves up as a wry satire on the self-centred middle classes occupying Egypt’s first row...its seaside setting, breezy insouciance and sharp undertow could see Summer Crowds achieve further festival berths after its Dubai world premiere.” Screendaily - Fionnuala Halligan

“Mohammad Khan brings us a story of a pre-summer voyage to the Egyptian coast. Filled with love, laughs and frustrations, the film is timeless and extremely enjoyable to watch. As the plot thickens, the characters and storyline develops, leaving you on the edge of your seat. The storyline was so relatable, not only to the people of Egypt or limited to only Arabic speakers. It was a story that could happen anywhere and to anyone.” Gulf News- Danielle van Jaarsveld